Thank you for attending Crip Camp Netflix Watch Party & Panel Discussion. This post contains the full text of the closed captions and the chat log. 

 

CHAT LOG
18:26:26 From Courtney / Art House Productions : Time to pop some popcorn! We’ll get started in a few minutes! If you have not already installed Netflix Party on your computer, please click here and follow these simple instructions to do so: https://www.netflixparty.com/
18:31:28 From Courtney / Art House Productions : Hello, Everybody, and welcome to the JC ADA 30 Festival’s Crip Camp Watch Party & Panel Discussion, in partnership with Art House Productions!
This event has live ASL Interpretation and Closed Captions. Support for accessibility services on this project provided in part through funding from Access A.R.T./New York, a program of the Alliance of Resident Theatres/New York (A.R.T./New York).
To view the ASL interpreter Stephanie Kanieski, we recommend finding her in the panelists tab and “pinning” the video. To pin the video, click the three dots at the top of her screen and select “Pin Video”.

To view the captions, click the CC button at the bottom of your screen, or use this link to access them in a separate web browser: https://www.streamtext.net/player?event=ArtHouse
18:39:37 From April Biggs (she/hers) : Those stories of overcoming can unintentionally reinforce the idea that we are and need to be “heroes” - and also perpetuates lack of access.
18:42:13 From Meredith / Art House (she/hers) : Here is Bojana’s email: bojanacoklyat@gmail.com
18:45:04 From Courtney / Art House Productions : If you have not already installed Netflix Party on your computer, please click here and follow these simple instructions to do so: https://www.netflixparty.com/
To join the party click the link below first, then click the red “NP” icon next to the address bar in the top right corner of your web browser. 
Remember, you must click this link first and then click the NP button!
To turn on Netflix’s captioning or audio description features, hover your mouse over the white speech bubble icon, located in the lower right hand corner of your video screen and select your desired language.
18:47:15 From Meredith / Art House (she/hers) : Cool! I’m in! I see many of you!
18:47:21 From Courtney / Art House Productions : You’ll know you’re in the party when a chat bar pops up on the right side of the movie! You may have the click the little puzzle piece at the top of your browser and then NP will show up underneath it.

19:11:22 From Courtney / Art House Productions : If you have any questions, feel free to unmute yourself or write them in the chat and I can help out!
20:34:50 From Courtney / Art House Productions : Welcome! The movie is still finishing up, we expect to start the panel in just a few minutes. Thanks!
This event has live ASL Interpretation and Closed Captions. Support for accessibility services on this project provided in part through funding from Access A.R.T./New York, a program of the Alliance of Resident Theatres/New York (A.R.T./New York).

To view the ASL interpreter Stephanie Kanieski, we recommend finding her in the panelists tab and “pinning” the video. To pin the video, click the three dots at the top of her screen and select “Pin Video”.

To view the captions, click the CC button at the bottom of your screen, or use this link to access them in a separate web browser: https://www.streamtext.net/player?event=ArtHouse
20:51:12 From Courtney / Art House Productions : This link was shared during the Watch Party, for anyone interested in reading “How to Properly Celebrate a Civil Rights Law During a Pandemic in Which Its Subjects Were Left to Die: The Americans With Disabilities Act”: https://crutchesandspice.com/2020/07/26/how-to-properly-celebrate-a-civil-rights-law-during-a-pandemic-in-which-its-subjects-were-left-to-die-the-americans-with-disabilities-act/
20:58:50 From Sarah Burroughs (she/her) : I have asked for that at the City level as well, Irene!
21:01:39 From Sarah Burroughs (she/her) : I actually called the state level equivalent to your department, Sioban, and they were the ones who gave me only links to places to make purchases, a link to someone that they thought loaned ramps but they were incorrect, and when I asked them if your department could help with more and the state said no
21:02:14 From Courtney / Art House Productions : http://www.hudsoncountynj.org/office-of-disability-services/
21:02:16 From Sarah Burroughs (she/her) : ended up not having a ramp for my event bc we could not find funds to purchase one and no one would rent or loan
21:03:11 From iPhoneSioban : I apologized that this was your experience
21:03:50 From Sarah Burroughs (she/her) : not your fault, you didn't even know!
21:03:55 From Katherine Partyka to Courtney / Art House Productions (Privately) : The tough thing about portable ramps is that they’re not always the correct slope for ADA so that in and of itself is an obstacle.
21:04:11 From Katherine Partyka : The tough thing about portable ramps is that they’re not always the correct slope for ADA so that in and of itself is an obstacle.
21:06:01 From Sarah Burroughs (she/her) : true, but the math isn't that hard and if there's going to be a group that rents them out, they should also provide consulting for those ramps if requested (or if shown it's necessary because in the application its clear the math/photos don't line up)
21:07:33 From iPhoneSioban : not sure that I could have assisted with a rental, however... I want to leave my work email and work phone numbers here... Email: Sleahy@hcnj.us, phone numbers: 2013695280 extension 4213. Or: 2016880677
21:07:39 From Sarah Burroughs (she/her) : woo Newark!
21:07:58 From Courtney / Art House Productions : More info about Eyes Like Mine: https://eyeslikemine.org/
21:13:01 From Courtney / Art House Productions : For more info about Art House productions: https://www.arthouseproductions.org/
21:13:24 From Courtney / Art House Productions : And the Access Committee: https://www.arthouseproductions.org/pages/accessibility
21:14:44 From Paul and Maggie Moo in Pasadena: This was terrific. The movie was great. 
21:15:14 From Courtney / Art House Productions: Thanks for coming!
21:15:48 From Meredith / Art House (she/hers) : I’d love to join Sioban! meredith@arthouseproductions.org
21:17:31 From Katherine Partyka : Yes, I’m here!
21:20:03 From Meredith / Art House (she/hers) : Thank you Irene! This is such an important point!
21:20:21 From Katherine Partyka : The acceptable slope for ADA is usually one foot length for one inch height. I work for Housing and if an existing building doesn’t have the conditions to meet ADA requirements, we try to at least make the building as accessible as possible.
21:20:32 From Sarah Burroughs (she/her) : When I was looking for ramps there were the ADA codes and there were the recommendations for when ADA codes were not reasonable in homes, historic buildings, and very small places. It was up to 14 degrees!
21:20:58 From Sarah Burroughs (she/her) : (which I know you all who work in this profession know, putting it out for others)
21:21:04 From Meredith / Art House (she/hers) : Yes!!!
21:26:59 From Meredith / Art House (she/hers) : If you’d like to get involved and continue to be part of these conversations, please add your email to the chat and we’ll add you to the email list
21:27:47 From iPhoneSioban : sleahy@hcnj.us
21:27:49 From Mikaela Brandon (she/her) : Mikaela.brandon15@gmail.com
21:28:19 From Katherine Partyka : kasia55@gmail.com
21:29:34 From Sarah Burroughs (she/her) : empathyaccess@gmail.com <-- my local access advocacy/consulting group for museums contact@sarahburroughs.com <-- me personally
21:29:45 From Art House Productions : amen Krystle!
21:30:00 From colleenloverde : colleenloverde@gmail.com
21:30:31 From Mike DiFeo : michaeldifeo@gmail.com
21:30:45 From Irene Borngraeber : irenepod@gmail.com
21:31:41 From Meredith / Art House (she/hers) : Thank you all so much for being here.
21:31:44 From Alex Tobey : Thanks to all the panelists for a great conversation!
21:31:54 From Art House Productions : Thanks everyone for joining us tonight!
21:31:55 From Meredith / Art House (she/hers) : The revolution will be accessible or else it’s no revolution at all.
21:32:02 From Sarah Burroughs (she/her) : Thank you everyone!
21:32:09 From Mike DiFeo : reach out to bojana at bojanacoklyat@gmail.com
21:32:11 From Mikaela Brandon (she/her) : thank you!

 

CLOSED CAPTIONS

18:32:34 Bojana: Thanks, Meredith! Thank you everybody for being here for the last event in the Jersey City ADA 30 festival! We
18:32:46 will watch Crip Camp: A Disability Revolution tonight. It's an amazing movie that is about disabled activists in the 70s who
18:32:58 met at a camp at Woodstock. They came together to organize around disability activism. The movie shows how it grew as a
18:33:06 movement and the ADA. We will watch that movie today in celebration of the 30th anniversary of the ADA be signed.
18:33:06


18:33:21 I want to do an access check to make sure everyone has what they need. If I'm talking too fast, feel free to ask me to
18:33:26 slow down. I live with vision loss myself, so I won't be able to read the chat, but someone else can let me know if anyone
18:33:26 needs anything.


18:33:43 We have an sign language interpreter, Stephanie, who will do sign language. You can pin her in your Zoom meeting and
18:33:52 access her that way. We also have captioning tonight. If you are watching on your phone, it's automatic. If you're on your
18:33:55 computer, the captioning option is on the lower half, I think titled CC, and you can click on that.


18:34:14 Also want people to feel comfortable. A friend of mine, he says to feel free to disregard social etiquette in the name of
18:34:22 access. So if I'm talking or during the movie or discussion, don't think that you can't do what you need to do. Feel free
18:34:30 to leave to use the bathroom, take a phone call, lay down, relax, and do whatever makes you feel most comfortable. Do
18:34:30 what you need to do in the name of access.


18:34:45 One of the reasons I wanted to show this film, and also to organize this festival in Jersey City for the ADA is to bring
18:34:57 more attention to access in the arts and media. In order to really have true diversity and engagement with everybody in
18:35:06 the arts community. Access doesn't have to be something so compliance-based or something so government-mandated. But it
18:35:16 can be something we give to each other. I think this film also exemplifies that in so many ways. Throughout the movie, you
18:35:26 will see examples of this as how other disabled people helped others with access, or how other non-disabled people helped
18:35:35 disabled people with access. It doesn't always mean a ramp, braille, or an interpreter, and those things are important,
18:35:43 but sometimes it's the little everyday moments, language, the way we put out different events on social media -- those are
18:35:52 ways that can be really important as far as access. Thinking of language used, thinking about image description on your
18:35:53 social media. This is also a really important part of access.


18:36:07 And it's something that doesn't necessarily cost more money, but it takes a little bit more time to be contentious of it.
18:36:07 Especially as we are in the virtual realm more now.


18:36:29 Part of the festival earlier today focused on that. We had an alt-text presentation showing how to create creative alt-text.
18:36:31 This is good for artists, finding ways to create a creative layer for our social media.


18:36:55 We also had a fantastic screening of disability-centered films, thanks to Golden Door Film Festival. We had great films on
18:36:56 Friday and are hoping to do more in the future.


18:37:13 Jersey City Theatre, I want to thank them for hosting a conversation about disability justice. I want to talk about
18:37:25 that because it's important as we move forward with access in the world. And also Jersey City. Disability access takes
18:37:38 into consideration the intersectionality of disability with other marginalized groups. You can't have meaningful access
18:37:41 and inclusion if people oppressed by ableism do not feel comfortable in those spaces.


18:37:57 We want to make sure everyone feels welcome, and it's not just something we take for granted, we live in one of the most
18:38:05 diverse cities in the country. A lot of museums are addressing this now, the potential alienation of people in more
18:38:07 marginalized communities.


18:38:22 The first day we talked a little bit about disability art. And what disability art is, trying to surface that more in Jersey
18:38:34 City. Getting away a little bit from the stories of overcoming disability or as inspiration, but more like disabled people
18:38:45 living. There is nothing necessarily wrong about inspiration, but those stories have been told over and over again. They
18:38:57 take up all the space when it comes to disability stories. So we wanted to talk about how we can tell other kinds of
18:39:03 disability stories. I'm looking forward to moving forward with that in Jersey City.


18:39:26 A big thanks to Art House productions! We have been trying to plan something over the past few months, and we wanted to
18:39:37 celebrate the 30th anniversary of the ADA, to create awareness around disability and inform people about access in the arts.
18:39:45 So a big thanks to Meredith, Courtney, and Miranda for organizing this, the access, the different volunteers, and
18:40:00 making this night happen. And being supportive in general in access. Especially with the JC Access Fridays which includes
18:40:02 the different art events to be accessible a little bit more and to think about it.


18:40:17 All of this together, this festival opened up a lot of conversations around access, around disability justice, around
18:40:28 disability. What can we keep doing? How can we be allies? In some ways, we sometimes think about access as something that
18:40:39 is so expensive. It can be if we are thinking about getting rid of stairs, having to put in an elevator, hiring multiple
18:40:46 interpreters -- that can all be expensive. But again, I want to think about access as something we give to each other.
18:40:57 It's what we give to each other in this community. Making a space feel welcoming, using language that makes disabled
18:41:09 people feel welcome. Describing the images on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram -- [Laughs.] That is part of access too!
18:41:09 Screen readers are important!


18:41:27 But access is what we give to each other. It's something as simple as a space like Art House or Jersey City Theatre Center
18:41:37 or Golden Door, providing a space to show movies, a performance, to get together to talk about disability, access,
18:41:48 and things around it. I want to continue to do that after this festival. I want you to email me, contact me in any way,
18:42:00 through Facebook, email, or my website. If you want to contact me, please do. I'm a disability rights activist, and I do art
18:42:09 access consulting. This is something I'm passionate about, so like I said, reach out if you have any further questions about
18:42:16 that. Or about making your spaces or your virtual events more accessible. I want to help with that in any way I can.

I
18:42:32 also want to talk a little bit more about this movie. I hope everybody can take the time to watch it all the way through.
18:42:43 It definitely shows disabled people in ways we might not normally see them. Falling in love, romance, as activists, as
18:42:45 creatives, as people pushing for what they want and making certain things happen.


18:43:03 One of my favorite moments in the film, I will talk about it afterwards, it always inspires me, it's one of the images on
18:43:12 our promotional flyer. We will talk about it after the movie where we will have a discussion with the disability community,
18:43:22 people working in disability services, the arts, etc. We will have a little discussion about our thoughts on the film. We
18:43:27 encourage you to take a look at the chat, any questions or comments you might have there. Please feel free to write them
18:43:27 there.


18:43:41 Think about this as the beginning of a conversation. This is not the end! It's the end of the festival, but it's the
18:43:54 beginning of a serious deep committed conversation about access and the arts in Jersey City. In the last census, 260,000
18:44:08 people here are disabled. That is a lot of people who are not recognized as much for access in the arts. As well as people
18:44:14 with invisible disabilities, mental illness, chronic illness, thinking about how we can make them feel more welcome in our
18:44:14 art spaces.


18:44:30 I want to continue to talk about that. I think I covered all the bases for now. I'm going to let us get set up for the
18:44:37 watch party for Crip Camp. I think maybe Miranda might have some little tid-bits of information on that.


18:44:46 But I will talk to you after the movie, and thank you for being here for the watch party!


18:45:02 Miranda: We are so excited to have this event with you. Maybe Maria or Brett can post in the chat, but we will post the
18:45:14 instructions for how to get on the Netflix party in the chat. If you have any trouble getting in, you can feel free to put
18:45:16 your questions in the Zoom that will remain open for you.


18:45:35 To get into the watch party, we will post the link in the chat. Make sure you click the link to the watch party first, and
18:45:46 then there is a little red NP icon that should appear in the top right corner of the browser next to the address bar. You
18:45:55 will hit that second, and it will get you into the watch party. Click the link first for the watch party, then click that
18:45:55 icon.


18:46:00 Please don't hesitate to type any questions into the chat.


18:46:12 Bojana: If they are unable to get in the watch party, they can watch the movie separately on their own and come back.


18:46:29 Miranda: Yes, absolutely. If the watch party logistics are not working for you, you can watch the movie on your own and
18:46:33 come back into the Zoom at 8:30. If you need, we will also post these instructions as well in the chat.


18:46:50 To access any captioning, you will need to turn that on yourself. It is very straightforward. When you are in
18:47:01 Netflix, if you hover your mouse over, in the bottom right-hand corner, there is a speech bubble icon. Click that, and you
18:47:11 can select the language of your choice for audio description and captioning. We will post that information in the chat for
18:47:20 you and give you some time to get over there. But as Bo mentioned, please watch on your own and then return to the
18:47:24 call if the logistics are giving you trouble. We want everyone to have a good time and see this awesome film.


18:48:01 We'll give you a few minutes. Thanks guys.


18:48:57 [Screening of Crip Camp: A Disability Revolution]


18:50:13 Courtney: For anyone having trouble in the Zoom, you can unmute yourself to ask any questions, or type them into the
18:50:14 chat.


18:50:29 If you are in Chrome and not seeing the NP button, if you have already downloaded the browser extension, in the top
18:50:46 right-hand corner of the Chrome, you might see a little gray puzzle piece that says "Extensions." If you click that, a
18:51:01 screen will pop down, and Netflix party will show up with any browser extensions you have downloaded, and you can click it
18:51:01 from there.


18:51:19 You can also, if you are in Chrome, go to window at the top of your screen. If you click that, Extensions will come up on
18:51:33 Window at the top of your screen. If you click that, Extensions will come up on that screen as well. You're
18:51:33 welcome to stay in here, but you don't have to. It's your choice. We will be here after for the panel. It's the same
18:53:56 Zoom link.


18:56:05

eginning of the ADA. We will watch that movie today in celebration of the 30th anniversary of the ADA being signed. I want to do an access check to make sure everyone has what they need. If I'm talking too fast, feel free to ask me to
18:56:05 slow down. I live with vision loss myself, so I won't be able to read the chat, but someone else can let me know if anyone the arts community. Access doesn't have to be something so compliance-based or something so government-mandated. But it needs anything.


18:56:05 We have an sign language interpreter, Stephanie, who will do sign language. You can pin her in your Zoom meeting and Jersey City Theatre, I want to thank them for hosting a conversation about disability justice. I want to talk about can be something we give to each other. I think this film also exemplifies that in so many ways. Throughout the movie, you
18:56:05 more attention to access in the arts and media. In order to really have true diversity and engagement with everybody in do more in the future.

will see examples of this as how other disabled people helped others with access, or how other non-disabled people helped
18:56:05 screening of disability-centered films, thanks to Golden Door Film Festival. We had great films on Friday and are hoping to One of the reasons I wanted to show this film, and also to organize this festival in Jersey City for the ADA is to bring disability stories. I'm looking forward to moving forward with that in Jersey City.


18:56:05 This is good for artists, finding ways to create a creative layer for our social media.

We also had a fantastic take up all the space when it comes to disability stories. So we wanted to talk about how we can tell other kinds of Part of the festival earlier today focused on that. We had an alt-text presentation showing how to create creative alt-text.
18:56:05 disabled people with access. It doesn't always mean a ramp, braille, or an interpreter, and those things are important, living. There is nothing necessarily wrong about inspiration, but those stories have been told over and over again. They that because it's important as we move forward with access in the world. And also Jersey City. Disability access takes
18:56:05 City. Getting away a little bit from the stories of overcoming disability or as inspiration, but more like disabled people

into consideration the intersectionality of disability with other marginalized groups. You can't have meaningful access
18:56:05 and inclusion if people oppressed by ableism do not feel comfortable in those spaces.

We want to make sure money, but it takes a little bit more time to be contentious of it. Especially as we are in the virtual realm more now. The first day we talked a little bit about disability art. And what disability art is, trying to surface that more in Jersey
18:56:05 everyone feels welcome, and it's not just something we take for granted, we live in one of the most diverse cities in the country. A lot of museums are addressing this now, the potential alienation of people in more marginalized social media. This is also a really important part of access.

And it's something that doesn't necessarily cost more
18:56:06 communities.

but sometimes it's the little everyday moments, language, the way we put out different events on social media -- those are ways that can be really important as far as access. Thinking of language used, thinking about image description on your
18:56:06 access her that way. We also have captioning tonight. If you are watching on your phone, it's automatic. If you're on your computer, the captioning option is on the lower half, I think titled CC, and you can click on that.

Also want people to feel comfortable. A friend of mine, he says to feel free to disregard social etiquette in the name of access. So if I'm
18:56:06 talking or during the movie or discussion, don't think that you can't do what you need to do. Feel free to leave to use the bathroom, take a phone call, lay down, relax, and do whatever makes you feel most comfortable. Do what you need to do in the name of access.


18:57:25 A big thanks to Art House Productions! We have been trying to plan something over the past few months, and we wanted to celebrate the 30th anniversary of the ADA, to create awareness around disability and inform people about access in the arts. access is what we give to each other. It's something as simple as a space like Art House or Jersey City Theatre Center or
18:57:25 So a big thanks to Meredith, Courtney, and Miranda for organizing this, the access, the different volunteers, and making this night happen. And being supportive in general in access. Especially with the JC Access Fridays which includes the images on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram -- [Laughs.] That is part of access too! Screen readers are important!

But
18:57:26 the different art events to be accessible a little bit more and to think about it.

All of this together, this festival other in this community. Making a space feel welcoming, using language that makes disabled people feel welcome. Describing opened up a lot of conversations around access, around disability justice, around disability. What can we keep
18:57:26 expensive. But again, I want to think about access as something we give to each other. It's what we give to each Golden Door, providing a space to show movies, a performance, to get together to talk about disability, access, and things around it. I want to continue to do that after this festival. I want you to email me, contact me in any way, through
18:57:26 we are thinking about getting rid of stairs, having to put in an elevator, hiring multiple interpreters -- that can all be doing? How can we be allies? In some ways, we sometimes think about access as something that is so expensive. It can be if access consulting. This is something I'm passionate about, so like I said, reach out if you have any further questions about
18:57:26 Facebook, email, or my website. If you want to contact me, please do. I'm a disability rights activist, and I do art that. Or about making your spaces or your virtual events more accessible. I want to help with that in any way I can.

I also want to talk a little bit more about this movie. I hope everybody can take the time to watch it all the way through.
18:57:26 It definitely shows disabled people in ways we might not normally see them. Falling in love, romance, as activists, as creatives, as people pushing for what they want and making certain things happen.

One of my favorite moments in the film, I will talk about it afterwards, it always inspires me, it's one of the images on our promotional flyer. We will talk
18:57:26 about it after the movie where we will have a discussion with the disability community, people working in disability services, the arts, etc. We will have a little discussion about our thoughts on the film. We encourage you to take a look at the chat, any questions or comments you might have there. Please feel free to write them there.

Think about
18:57:26 this as the beginning of a conversation. This is not the end! It's the end of the festival, but it's the beginning of a serious deep committed conversation about access and the arts in Jersey City. In the last census, 260,000 people here are disabled. That is a lot of people who are not recognized as much for access in the arts. As well as people with invisible
18:57:26 disabilities, mental illness, chronic illness, thinking about how we can make them feel more welcome in our art spaces.

I want to continue to talk about that. I think I covered all the bases for now. I'm going to let us get set up for the
18:57:26 watch party for Crip Camp. I think maybe Miranda might have some little tid-bits of information on that.

But I will talk to you after the movie, and thank you for being here for the watch party!

Miranda: We are so excited to have this event with you. Maybe Maria or Brett can post in the chat, but we will post the instructions for how to get on the Netflix
18:57:26 party in the chat. If you have any trouble getting in, you can feel free to put your questions in the Zoom that will remain open for you.


18:58:41 To get into the watch party, we will post the link in the chat. Make sureWindow" at the top of your screen. If you click Revolution]

that, "Extensions" will come up on that screen as well. You're welcome to stay in here, but you don't have to. It's your
18:58:41 choice. We will be here after for the panel. It's the same Zoom link.

[Screening of Crip Camp: A Disability
19:19:40

20:42:55 . . .

[Fixing captions]

Linda: Crip Camp was big on freedom, such an interesting story to watch the Civil Rights movement at a summer camp. Then
20:42:57 they graduated and came together again and they had that experience where they were treated well and were able to
20:42:57 access everything.


20:43:09 Even though it was a brief part of their life, they were able to recreate that in the general world.


20:43:30 Bojana: Going from taking people's lasagna orders, going to a camp, and then calling the shots in DC, it's like some type of
20:43:35 special -- what is it? Like the President's Council for People with Disabilities or something. She is doing so much now.
20:43:35


20:43:38 Any other thoughts?


20:44:03 Irene: I'm going to go right for Civil Rights. How can we not? Especially at this time. I can to confess that as a person
20:44:15 with a physical disability, I was not aware the work that went into the ADA. Connecting this to the Civil Rights Movement is
20:44:22 powerful. We talk about marginalized communities, people who don't necessarily have access in the same way that others do,
20:44:29 and we don't necessarily understand that. For myself, I didn't really understand that privilege because I was born after
20:44:31 1980.


20:44:47 That is so huge! Because a difference of 35 years in our experience can radically change everything. I feel like that
20:44:57 is where we are struggling as a community. I don't know what it's like to be told I can't go to a public school. I've
20:45:08 always gone. So learning that and the intersectionality between that and the Civil Rights Movement, and knowing how
20:45:16 they coalesced, we have to be better as allies in this. From a racial justice perspective, but also from an advocacy
20:45:16 perspective.


20:45:19 There is so much here! [Laughs.]


20:45:29 Bojana: This is going to go until 10! [Laughs.] Buckle in!


20:45:45 Irene: I run an animal shelter, and this is such a big thing about equal treatment between sentient beings. There is a
20:45:59 translation that a lot of people don't recognize. Or that we don't recognize with humans but can with animals -- sorry,
20:45:59 that is my dog panting! [Laughs.]


20:46:17 We are in Upstate New York. Right in the thick of all of this. So I wonder this utopia and everything going on in the 70s
20:46:32 for justice and advocacy and free love or whatever you want to call it, how do we get rid of this jaded, cynical entitlement?
20:46:32 To get back to advocating for what matters for each other?


20:46:45 I feel like we have kind of lost that. It saddens me in a sense. That's way too much, so I'm going to stop talking!
20:46:47 [Laughs.]


20:47:08 Sioban: Irene, I want to totally agree. I didn't fully understand the history and the way the Disability Movement and
20:47:17 Civil Rights Movement was integrated. You're right, we need to get back to just being together, helping each other out. You
20:47:31 see so much on social media, instead of banning together, people have a "what about us?" mentality. Like "we should
20:47:36 matter too, and this should matter." Watching the movie struck me. How do we get back together?


20:47:59 There is a hashtag going around against Black Lives Matter that says Disabled Lives Matter or Blind Lives Matter. People
20:48:07 being angry that there is such a big push for Black Lives Matter right now. I never understand why this is a thing. If
20:48:15 you have been discriminated against for any reason, you should understand what it feels like and be in other groups' corners.
20:48:15


20:48:41 Bojana: Absolutely. It's interesting to me because I feel like, who is saying that? The largest contingent of people
20:48:42 who are disabled are people of color.


20:49:07 How can we talk about real access if we are not thinking about everyone else who is oppressed? This is called the Summer of
20:49:19 Solidarity. I've seen that. Even in the Heights, the neighborhood association is working for a solidarity
20:49:24 procession on August 9th. I was trying to work with them to make it more accessible and inclusive. But that is happening.
20:49:24


20:49:41 We need to ban together. And I think also going back to what Irene said, this is not like, "well, we can't put that ramp
20:49:41 In." This is a civil rights issue.


20:49:47 in." This is a civil rights issue.


20:49:56 The ADA is the only law enforced by education. It's people having to go back and tell someone for 10 years what needs to
20:49:56 be done.


20:50:15 Sioban: It is a good reminder that the ADA and the 504 are Civil Rights issues. If you are not in compliance, if you are
20:50:18 not attempting to figure out a way to be, you are violating someone's civil rights.


20:50:33 Irene: From the legal perspective, working with municipal government and local and regional government, when it's a
20:50:45 civil right, you have to sue. There is no one who will take your back if you are claiming discrimination based on lack of
20:50:49 accessibility. That also opens you up to criticisms from people saying you are just doing this because you can make it
20:50:49 an issue.


20:51:07 That is a challenge. I think that is a legitimate concern in a lot of ways. It also really deprofessionalizes the work that
20:51:11 Bo, you're trying to do, to take us back to a perspective of education and advocacy rooted in the law.


20:51:26 These are some of the challenges we see in local law enforcement specifically. The enforcement protocols are very
20:51:39 little. There is very little anyone can do to impact it. That creates a culture. That is why I said "non-neglect" over and
20:51:50 over again. People can get away with it because there is no enforcement. And no reinforcement for positive behavior like
20:51:50 when organizations like Art House step up and move forward.


20:52:05 So there is a cultural issue there. And when we are thinking about involving diverse opinions, if we are sitting on this
20:52:17 Zoom call talking about diversity and the ADA, we come from a center of privilege. So that is an issue. That's not an
20:52:18 issue that is unique to this form of advocacy. We see it in everything else.


20:52:33 But it does narrow the voices, it narrows the people involved in that conversation. It's the people who can afford to
20:52:54 support them while they do that 24-day sit-in without their caretaker or medication -- we need to realize, there was a
20:53:01 profound sacrifice in that. A personal sacrifice. For the next step, we need to think about that direction. We won't
20:53:01 argue this out in social media.


20:53:17 Bojana: To speak to that a little bit more, just because my specialty is the arts, I have diligently reached out to
20:53:23

everyone you can think of with any power in the arts in Jersey City. But that wasn't working, so let me reach out to --
20:53:35 Irene: I'm sorry, but we don't have power in the arts regionally! We have some at the state level, but we are under
20:53:36 the thumb of people in power.


20:53:54 Bojana: Yes. I think if anything though, our local government who are supposed to help with some oversight with the ADA can
20:54:02 at least potentially model some better behavior. That's what I was looking for in reaching out when I was still doing that.
20:54:03


20:54:21 Even if you reach out to the local ADA office in New York, they will give you resources. We don't really have power unless we
20:54:29 sue. So then you go to Disability Rights NJ to look for someone to advocate for you. They tell you they don't have
20:54:33 the staff because it's for the arts, not employment, education, or housing. That is what I was told.


20:54:56 I reached out to the State Council on the Arts and there is nothing they can do either. So there is no oversight. There
20:55:04 is an organization that advocates for disabled people, but they don't have the bandwidth to do it all.


20:55:21 Speaker: That is a problem in general. I work for the county, and people will call me and say, "My civil rights have been
20:55:31 violated." I give them the resources that I have that are free or cost-effective. And there is not enough staff. Nobody has
20:55:32 enough staff. It's really sad.


20:55:50 Bojana: We have the ADA and it helps with certain things, but where does the teeth lie with the ADA? Is it then just in
20:55:52 being able to sue, to have a class action lawsuit to make the change we want to see?


20:56:08 This is the first time with this festival that this is happening on a larger scale, this conversation. With these
20:56:11 different platforms and organizations about access and disability. That is an interesting thing.


20:56:30 The last time we did a panel like this, this was with Meredith Lipman, and it was also at Art House. Since then, I don't
20:56:39 know when the next time there has been a panel of its kind, bringing together people with disability expertise to talk
20:56:39 publicly about these things.


20:56:54 Maybe we don't have the agency to force people to do these different access items and accommodations, but maybe we can
20:57:06 inform people. Maybe we can ask the different art venus to shift and change, those who are open to it but don't think
20:57:17 they have the funding or staff, to give us a platform to talk about this. It can help to crystallize some of the things we
20:57:20 want, to get more of a diversity of voices. We have to start somewhere.


20:57:39 Irene: I agree. To the country's credit, I did consult on a panel from an accessibility standpoint. I was one of the
20:57:50 panelists. I have never known that to take place in previous years. I know it's a federal obligation, but working with the
20:58:00 county, this is the first time I was able to do that. There were some interesting conversations that came from that. That
20:58:06 is maybe where we could work to put together some guidelines or maybe thought questions for people looking to get involved in local arts.


20:58:23 One of the suggestions I made, because I'm pretty nuts and bolts, living within your means is one thing, but trying to
20:58:35 expand that to be accessible is sometimes pretty easy if you have the appropriate questions to ask. One thing I suggested
20:58:51 to them at the time was is it possible to have a rental bank of things like portable ramps? Or assistive hearing technology
20:58:57 or augmented television screens? Or if you want to do a projection? Or something that needs an audio component?
20:58:57


20:59:08 It's technically affordable, but you need the knowledge base. You need someone coaching you to make that viable.


20:59:28 Sioban: I do think that is offered through the state, and I'm thinking of my own office, but that's kind of what I exist
20:59:39 for. We help to pay for a lot of programs and fund them, but my main goal in my office and main duty is information and
20:59:40 referral.


20:59:56 That's sort of what I like to be and what I strive to be and what I often do. People call, they have questions, and I try
21:00:01 to point them in the right direction. But again, it's having the knowledge to even know that I exist and to make the phone
21:00:04 call.


21:00:15 Irene: And Sioban, for you, could you have a budget to rent equipment?


21:00:37 Sioban: I'm not in charge of that, but we have some programs where we can get stuff for people through Heightened
21:00:48 independence and Progress, and I have some other resources, but my point is, there are people who haven't gotten to speak yet,
21:01:05 and I apologize, but my point is anyone who is on here or anyone who hears this who sees my name, I work for Hudson
21:01:13 County Office of Disability Services. Just look up my name and reach out. Find the number, you can always call and ask for
21:01:13 me.


21:01:26 I just want everyone to know I'm available and I'm out there, this is what I'm here for. I'm just happy to be a part of
21:01:27 this discussion.


21:01:49 Bojana: Absolutely, Sioban. Irene, I recommended you for the panel for Hudson County. It's interesting, you being on the
21:02:04 panel, I'm assuming you weren't there the years I was because I would have known, but I can elaborate on the Hudson County
21:02:18 process. Unless you really know those venues, there is no oversight or follow-through in how they spend the money. I
21:02:21 have emailed extensively for different things that could be done.


21:02:48 I hope something will change. I'm not sure. Because I had a very fruitful conversation with them last August about working
21:03:05 on some of the items I mentioned, putting together an advisory council, putting together a webinar. It's July, and it still
21:03:05 hasn't been prioritized.


21:03:24 I think they are fulfilling this thing, going through the motions of this panel, but there is no teeth to it. There is
21:03:34 no teeth, no education that comes from that county. They put together a webinar, they tell people a week beforehand, nobody
21:03:42 shows up, oh well! There needs to be something more from our government! To me, as one person to be doing this type of
21:03:43 thing . . .


21:04:04 Krystle: I agree, Bojana! About getting the government involved. To pay attention to our issues. I enjoyed Crip
21:04:13 Camp. I have been going on the Sunday calls they have had to review the movie and have discussion. I enjoyed the fact that
21:04:23 the movie depicted real people who have disabilities. Because there are so many films that try to portray our lifestyles,
21:04:34 and the actor doesn't even have a disability! On top of that, the movie had audio description. Coming from one visually
21:04:39 impaired person to the next! It offered a lot of inclusion so that I could get the general idea of what the action was
21:04:42 happening.


21:05:00 I can relate to when the young man was talking about his camp counselor and how he began to admire her and when they had to
21:05:13 do the personal care, [Laughs], he was just being a boy! And that was the point of it all, we are just who we are. My
21:05:23 disability is not what defines life. We should be recognized as people first. We should have people-first language. When
21:05:23 others who are not like us are addressing us.


21:05:45 Unfortunately, even today, we have to fight for just that! To be addressed as "Bojana" and not "blind girl" or "Sioban" and
21:05:46 not "she's doing all that work!" [Laughs.]


21:06:02 We are active in our communities, and if it wasn't for us and others who came before us to make these changes and
21:06:12 conversations and these in-your-face situations, we have a long way to go, but we are having these different conversations to
21:06:12 make sure that these issues are changed.


21:06:29 Even the young lady, I think she was going to the doctor, and he was saying something about she probably needs to have sex
21:06:39 or whatever, it's weird when people will see those with disabilities and don't think of them as a person. As a person
21:06:53 who builds relationships with other people, be it business, leisure, or romance, whatever it could be. They don't think
21:06:59 of us in that context. We are trying to break those barriers down, and I feel this movie and the ADA movement is just the
21:06:59 start.


21:07:06 Bojana: You have some great news about the mayor of Newark, right?


21:07:26 Krystle: Yes, right before today's event, I had an event with my organization and the City of Newark proclaiming today as
21:07:37 Newark's ADA Day in observance of the Americans With Disabilities Act. There have been a lot of steps the city has
21:07:50 taken to influence our community and make sure residents with disabilities are included. They made a purchase of devices
21:08:14 this year so that residents can have an additional support they can use, like in the supermarkets, Shop Rite, Whole Foods, the
21:08:30 health center for Newark Department of Health, and other places that residents with disabilities may frequent. They allowed
21:08:35 me to do some in-service training to a staff of 400 to inform them about people with different disabilities, not just
21:08:35 blindness.


21:08:48 They are in the field of helping, so you will encounter different people at different times who are dealing with
21:09:06 different stages of whatever their issue is, whether disability or not. It's important for these people who call themselves
21:09:09 social workers or helping professionals on being able to just interact with us! [Laughs.]


21:09:27 Bojana: Yes, Krystle, say it again! [Laughs.] Even in the arts or other spaces, people have a hesitation to reach out to
21:09:40 an online group or people in person or people at another gathering, to ask them to be a part of an event or ask them a
21:09:56 question about, "what do you think about this potential event?" Etc. People maybe look something up online, they try to do
21:10:05 that thing they found online, or they heard it from someone like a game of telephone, and they implement that access
21:10:10 without actually talking to a disabled person to get their expertise or life experience. Taking time out to do that.
21:10:10


21:10:31 It's not something that is so difficult to do in Jersey City, but when I look at the more local level of things, when I talk
21:10:45 to people with these issues that are not addressed, what needs to be done? Does it need to be the government modeling better
21:10:53 behavior? Helping with more education somehow? Do we need more events centering disability? Does it need to be
21:10:55 something we are all doing together, doing things like this? I don't know. Or all of these things.


21:11:11 What I'm really trying to figure out is what can we all do as a group to make this generative and sustainable? What can we
21:11:11 do? This is just the beginning! [Laughs.]


21:11:30 Krystle: What you're saying, there is power in numbers. There should definitely be more of a collective effort. It doesn't
21:11:39 just have to be Hudson or Essex County. New Jersey has 21 counties. So if more of these types of settings were
21:11:48 including more people who are advocates out there in the trenches, trying to get their voices heard and make
21:11:54 significant change for our current lives and the lives coming behind us, because people with disabilities have been living
21:11:54 since humanity began!


21:12:15 We need more of these types of settings. I get Sioban's emails all the time, some of the things she has sent out, it wows me.
21:12:29 Even Milly, oh my goodness, Milly, Milly, Milly! [Laughs.] We have an access community with Art House. I don't see any
21:12:31 other theater houses with an access committee. Maybe I'm just so stuck on Art House!


21:12:43 I don't see what some of the others are doing the way Art House is. That's why I have such a loyal appreciation for Art
21:12:43 House.


21:12:50 Thank you Bojana for introducing me to this!


21:13:13 Bojana: Yes, absolutely! Years ago, I don't know how many now -- 7 years ago -- I started the Access Committee at Art House.
21:13:25 And I went to grad school and passed it to Rachel Handler. But Meredith has done a great job being committed to that,
21:13:27 doing an Access JC Fridays. They have been doing sustained access work at Art House.


21:13:44 There are other people interested, other organizations like Nimbus who are interested in sustainable access, the Jersey
21:13:55 City Theatre Center, they are open to doing different things. The Golden Door Film Festival, so there are definitely other
21:14:04 organizations I'm hoping to open this up to. It's just a beginning conversation to speak to what Irene said before,
21:14:09 because we are here, and also this is a very particular point of view, I want to open it up, I want the word to spread about
21:14:09 what where.


21:14:22 e are talking about. And to meet like this so we can talk about what we need to happen as far as access.


21:14:34 There is so much. My expertise is access in the arts, but there is so many other things to be worked on.


21:14:59 Sioban: In Hudson County, I know a lot of others have it as well, and you will have to go through your own county's Office
21:15:09 of Disability Services, but we have an advisory board that meets quarterly. The meetings are open to the public. Anyone
21:15:14 can attend. We talk about the things we have on the agenda, but we always open it for people to talk about what they might
21:15:15 need.


21:15:32 Unfortunately, we haven't had a meeting in quite a while because of the pandemic, and the meeting right before that,
21:15:47 there was a huge snow storm. So we haven't had one in a while, but they are usually quarterly. I send out the emails, and I
21:16:00 also will send the advisory board stuff I get constantly, but also the invites for the meetings. Members can send me stuff,
21:16:06 and then I will also -- sorry, I got distracted because someone sent an email about wanting to join the advisory board!
21:16:06 [Laughs.]


21:16:23 But if you want to join, I'd tell you to put it in the chat, but honestly, I put my email in the chat, and it would make my
21:16:29 life a lot easier if you just send me an email. The chat won't go away once the Zoom call ends, right? I can go back and
21:16:30 look at it?


21:16:37 Bojana: Yes, we can save it too. I imagine there are some good . . .


21:16:59 Sioban: You can save it and send it out. I'm working off my phone because it's easier. That's fine. Anyone who wants to
21:17:02 join, put an email address in the chat, or send me an email, and I will add you to the list.


21:17:07 You can send me anything you want, and so on and so forth.


21:17:23 Bojana: Thank you, Sioban. Is there a Katherine who has commented? I invited a Katherine to be part of the talk, and
21:17:30 she wanted to communicate through chat, but I don't know if we see anything there from her. I just didn't want her comments
21:17:31 to get lost.


21:17:47 Courtney: Yes, she commented a little bit about the difficulty of renting portable ramps and making sure that they are the
21:18:01 correct slope for ADA. Back when we were talking about renting different resources or having resources available to borrow
21:18:06 for local organizations. She mentioned that as an obstacle for those programs. Yes, she is here! Great!


21:18:14 Katherine, feel free to keep writing, and I will interject!


21:18:32 Sioban: Yes, they have to be a specific height and length. When people want equipment for their homes, we refer them to
21:18:44 Heightened Independence and Progress, and often they have to have people go out to see if the house or building is even
21:18:44 equipped to be made accessible.


21:19:07 Irene: To play a little bit of devil's advocate, there is a little difference between egality, expectation, and reality.
21:19:16 The ADA has a limited slope in terms of what is acceptable for public access. But these are for buildings that are federally
21:19:17 accessible. That is the ADA code.


21:19:36 I wonder with retrofits and rentals, the ability to get into a building or not being able to get in period, it is a different
21:19:55 standard. If you have federal funding to supply these ramps, then yes, you have to meet ADA standards. But if you are just
21:19:59 giving your neighborhood pool $500 to jerryrig some plywood, that is okay, as long as they sign a liability waiver.


21:20:20 That's where we need to have an intersection. The ADA is wonderful, but it's not possible in historic buildings. I
21:20:31 acceptable way, but I live there, so I'm going to do it!

live in a row house, I have been in a wheelchair for another five months. I can't get into my building in a legally
21:20:51 That is what we need to understand, yes, there is the ideal, the ADA. Yes, you are beholden to them with federal funding.
21:21:02 But otherwise, it's a crap shoot. Like what Bo was commenting about, this is adaptation. Like getting a U-Haul and getting
21:21:12 a bunch of people in the back of it, yes, we do that shit! [Laughs.] That is sometimes where we are. Is it always
21:21:15 right? Does it always feel great? No. But it's about being there, about participating.


21:21:29 That's where our governments need to get off of this, and I know you get your funding from the federal government, and it
21:21:40 all passes through because Hudson County doesn't have many resources dedicated to disability, diversity, or inclusion, so
21:21:52 I know it's a funding issue. So if we need to advocate to Tom, we can meet with him to talk about this in a way where we can
21:22:03 potentially open it up. Or from the grassroots perspective, I have some plywood, and maybe that is the difference of you
21:22:03 having that option at all for accessibility versus not.


21:22:24 Bo, to speak to what you said before, I'm totally grassroots. The reason we are able to do what we are able to do is because
21:22:34 we seized every opportunity presented. So if that's what we need to do, we should have a maker conference about access.
21:22:44 Maybe it's in the hands of the makers and they can then apply for grants to offset that. And empowering people from the
21:22:53 bottom up, we are not here to demonize them are say they are bad people for having stairs or not having a ramp or
21:22:53 accessible language, we are here to help.


21:23:02 That's really powerful. Because then we give people the tools needed to have success, to show them it can be powerful.
21:23:03


21:23:22 Bojana: I absolutely agree. I think it will take a lot of different approaches. It probably will be a combination of
21:23:38 grassroots and the government, they have to stop ignoring this. That would be a powerful -- even if it was just them talking
21:23:53 about it, taking the time to talking about it and address it in that way, I'm not even asking for them -- Hudson County is not
21:23:58 ADA compliant, it's not! But I'm just talking about modeling best practices and the best way to talk about this.


21:24:11 I think what happens more than anything is that organizations say, "We don't have the money." And that is it.


21:24:18 Irene: And all the challenges evaporate, right? [Laughs.]


21:24:35 Bojana: Or a place that has a ramp, they are like, "We've done everything!" But there is so much more! So much to talk
21:24:48 about. I think we need to keep having these conversations, to be in touch with Sioban, Krystle, Irene, Katherine, Linda,
21:25:00 Meredith, people who are supportive about this. And dreaming about a place for all of the people in Jersey City who are
21:25:10 living here, so they can feel welcome. Especially in the virtual age, so many people are using Zoom, why can't we
21:25:21 continue to use it as an access tool. For people who can't get into a space, or are too sick to go -- we need to keep this
21:25:30 ? For people who can't get into a space, or are too sick to go -- we need to keep this virtual option for people as well. So
21:25:31 thinking about things in the future from the things we have learned now.


21:25:49 Irene: My physical reality is rooted in my physical reality. I'm very much in my body. So my ability to move and not move
21:26:00 is what limits my engagement with things. But this is the challenge in talking about the disability community in that
21:26:11 sense. I can see, and that is not a challenge I face, so that is not a part of my thought process. So having these
21:26:23 conversations is crucial, but also putting together a toolkit might be helpful for people who don't experience any of these
21:26:36 challenges to say, "Here's what I can run down. These are the perspectives to which I need to speak if I'm going to be
21:26:37 thinking about this in an inclusive way."


21:26:58 Bojana: These toolkits exist. But where are they coming from? If we want to affect Jersey City in a systematic way, I have
21:26:58 this toolkit! If I have this information --


21:27:02 Irene: You are only one person! [Laughs.]


21:27:09 Bojana: Exactly! Please, someone take my toolkit! [Laughs.]


21:27:25 Irene: That's where I go back to the Office of Diversity and Inclusion which used to exist in Jersey City. It might still
21:27:38 exist, but I don't know what they are doing. So that might be a start. If not, then that is where the point of advocacy
21:27:48 maybe should occur. We have to do an assessment of political weakness. Where is the pressure point here? Hudson County?
21:27:48 But they have very little influence over Jersey City.


21:28:03 So if we want to have an impact on Jersey City, we need to start politically in this area. It's a different kettle of
21:28:26 fish. This is what I do professionally. It's a different kettle of fish. But it's still approachable. I think now
21:28:26 it's specifically poignant.


21:28:45 Bojana: I don't know this to be so Bojana and Irene heavy, [Laughs], but I want to open this up if there are any other
21:28:56 comments, if anyone wants to contribute any other thoughts about this idea of organizing around access -- I want to open
21:28:59 that up again. I also don't want to keep these wonderful people from Art House here too long.


21:29:10 Krystle: Maybe an access roundtable, if possible. Maybe a seasonal one or a quarterly one.


21:29:17 Bojana: You read my mind! [Laughs.] You're going to be on it!


21:29:33 Krystle: The fact that this is the 30th anniversary of the ADA, but this year is the 100th anniversary of the Women's
21:29:43 Rights Movement. And all of us are women here talking about the disability issues, but we also have issues just being a
21:29:55 woman! If somehow we could have access roundtables to have these thought-provoking conversations. But also that action
21:29:59 plan to support the conversations. It's only going to happen with our minds and action moving forward.


21:30:03 Bojana: Yes, Krystle.


21:30:06 Sioban: Great point and idea.


21:30:18 Bojana: I agree. Keeping the conversation going. I have a lot of time! [Laughs.]


21:30:32 Sioban: Meredith did say if anyone wants to continue this conversation, put your email in the chat. I put mine, and
21:30:32 several people are as well.


21:30:53 Bojana: Great. Maybe we should wrap it up because we went over just a little! This was such a great conversation. This
21:31:01 is the second time I've watched this movie, and it motivated me and fired me up again just like the first time. It was great
21:31:13 having you all to speak to about it right after and during. I want to thank everybody at Art House. Courtney, Miranda,
21:31:24 Meredith, Stephanie, the sign language interpreter, the captioner, everyone who helped out. Everyone tuning into this
21:31:25 talk.


21:31:46 I want to end with one thing I read on Instagram from an amazing disability justice advocate, Mia Mingus [sp?], she
21:31:47 said, "The revolution must be accessible, or it's no revolution at all."


21:32:02 So thank you everybody if you have any questions about this festival or anything in the future, please reach out to me.
21:32:06 I'm happy to answer any questions. I have so much gratitude for everyone who helped out with this festival and tonight.
21:32:07


21:32:13 [Thank yous.]